before and after

Before and After – c.1900 Handyman Special in Erie, PA

Here is the Before and After of a fixer upper we featured back in January of 2021 when it was most recently on the market for $27,000 and sold in March for $27,000. The home was flipped, re-listed for $98,600 and sold again for $96,000 on 11/5,2021. I can’t believe they got rid of the original floor-to-ceiling cupboard!

BEFORE

OHU50K NOTES

Two features stand out in this c.1900 handyman special – the mantel with gorgeous green tiles and the floor-to-ceiling cupboard. Again with the glaring paint choices in most of the rooms, but that is easily changed.

 

  • 4bed
  • 1.5bath
  • 1,714sqft
  • 4,356sqft lot
  • Year Built 1900
  • Google Map

334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA, 16502          $40,000 Sold on March 17, 2021 for $27,000

Handyman special to fix up, to flip, rent, or to make your own! This great opportunity includes large living spaces in every room, a convenient half-bath on the first floor, a pass-through from the kitchen to the dining room, wide stairways, covered front porch, wheelchair ramp in the back, and updated electrical. Conveniently located within walking distance to AHN St. Vincent and a few minutes drive to all downtown amenities. Sold AS-IS, cash offers preferred. May not qualify for bank financing.

AFTER

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502
Beautiful 4 bedroom. Newly renovated kitchens and baths. Brand new refrigerator, gas range, dishwasher, quartz solid surface countertops with backsplash. Generous room sizes. Enjoy the fresh air on your open covered porch. Expandable 3rd floor offers lots of storage or finish for additional living space. New high efficient furnace and hot water tank. Updated electric and plumbing. Schedule your visit today.
Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

 

Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502Photo of property at 334 W 22nd St, Erie, PA 16502

8 Comments

  • U thot

    Can we all agree that gentrification isn’t cute? You bought an affordable house and flipped it so no working class family could afford it… y’all should be ashamed. Seriously, Erie is an area where there are actual families looking for homes like this and you stole that from them, I hope you think about that when you try to fall asleep or look yourself in the mirror.

  • [email protected]

    I don’t know who you are referring to as “you,” but revitalizing a neighborhood helps those already in place to live in better homes and neighborhoods, often lowering the crime rate and improving the sense of community. I very much doubt working class families have $30,000 in cash to buy a fixer upper that cannot be financed due to its condition, and another $30,000 to $50,000 cash to repair. Would you rather the house becomes another abandoned eyesore contributing to a further decline of the area?
    Now fixed up and eligible for conventional financing, a working class family could more easily put 10% down and have a manageable mortgage/tax/insurance payment of approx. $775, not go in debt to renovate the place, have a nice place to raise their family and have pride of ownership.

  • Leta Bez-Wogen

    I don’t know if this is “gentrification” really but grey Pergo type floors are the bane of handsome, old houses like this one. The neutral, bland schemes look like it’s ready to rent and not personal. Losing the original kitchen cupboards and laying industrial carpeting – blech.

  • REBECCA JOINER

    Oh gees, they killed the kitchen. It definitely does not ‘fit’ into a house like this 🙁
    I am also sad to see carpet on the stairs.

  • sstevens

    I don’t mind the kitchen so much but I agree with the carpeting on the stairs (and pretty much everywhere for that matter) would have loved to see some restoration on the hardwood that had not been covered up yet. Also do not care for the pale blue color. To be perfectly honest I am not much of a carpet person all around it just collects stains, dust and odors. I kind of agree that it looks like it was made livable and passible but not much personality which sort of tells me there was more practicality and less love involved.

  • Stephen Miller

    Now this is what I’m talking about. Absolutely love the renovation. Even at 96K it’s a steal. I love this website.

  • Naima Haviland

    Oldhousesunder50k, I couldn’t have voiced a better rebuttal. Sorry you took that attack. I’ll voice my own opinion of gentrification clumsily, but in the best voice I have. I love old houses and hate to see them neglected and falling into derelict condition, because they were once houses people were proud to live in and it makes me sad for those original residents. For the second time, I bought and live in a cheap house on a bad street. All around me, I see renters living in houses owned by neglectful landlords. The landlords do not maintain the properties to where they are even safe for their tenants, let alone attractive and comfortable. But the tenants (most of whom are nice people) just let errant scraps of trash lie on their lawn indefinitely, and worse. I don’t understand the anger against “gentrifiers” when people in challenged neighborhoods already aren’t doing the bare minimum for their own environment. Moving in and restoring a house should not be a point of shame. Yes, my phrasing is clumsy, but I hope not offensive. Ok, rant over.

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